Björg Thordardottiraffiliated with the university

Research areas and keywords

UKÄ subject classification

  • Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy

Keywords

Research

I am a reg. occupational therapist since 1997 and M.Sc. since 2011, PhD degree in 2016. My position is at first funded by MultiPark, a strategic research area of neuroscience at Lund University (http://www.med.lu.se/multipark). My focus was on activity and participation among people with Parkinson’s disease and the aim was to create a base of knowledge for future efforts towards supporting participation for people with Parkinson’s disease

In the summer of 2014 I became a member of the research group “Participation, ageing and everyday life”. A specific research focus is how different interventions in the home can facilitate participation, independence and an active daily life, e.g.  by means of housing adaptions. The target group of our research is adults with limitations in participation and everyday life due to illness, injury or age. The aim of my studies is to describe activity, participation, accessibility and usability of housing among housing adaptation clients. Also, to investigate the relationship of those aspects to frequency and satisfaction with participation and health related quality of life. My supervisor was Associate Professor Agneta Malmgren Fänge and co-supervisors Lisa Ekstam and Carlos Chiatti. 

Thesis
Thordardottir, B. (2016). Home, health and participation. For community living people with disability. Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden. ISBN 1652-8220

Research

I defended my thesis in the spring of 2016.  The thesis addresses perspectives of home, health and participation among people with disabilities who live in their own homes. Currently I am a project administrator in a European project: HOME4DEM (links: www.home4dem.org; www.home4dem.eu). The project aim is to support people with dementia to live  independently and stay at home longer and reduce the possible strain on their relatives.

Recent research outputs

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