A hypothesis - generating Swedish extended national cross-sectional family study of multimorbidity severity and venous thromboembolism

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common worldwide disease. The burden of multimorbidity, that is, two or more chronic diseases, has increased. Whether multimorbidity is associated with VTE risk remains to be studied. Our aim was to determine any association between multimorbidity and VTE and any possible shared familial susceptibility.

DESIGN: A nationwide extended cross-sectional hypothesis - generating family study between 1997 and 2015.

SETTING: The Swedish Multigeneration Register, the National Patient Register, the Total Population Register and the Swedish cause of death register were linked.

PARTICIPANTS: 2 694 442 unique individuals were analysed for VTE and multimorbidity.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Multimorbidity was determined by a counting method using 45 non-communicable diseases. Multimorbidity was defined by the occurrence of ≥2 diseases. A multimorbidity score was constructed defined by 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 or more diseases.

RESULTS: Sixteen percent (n=440 742) of the study population was multimorbid. Of the multimorbid patients, 58% were females. There was an association between multimorbidity and VTE. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for VTE in individuals with multimorbidity (2 ≥ diagnoses) was 3.16 (95% CI: 3.06 to 3.27) compared with individuals without multimorbidity. There was an association between number of diseases and VTE. The adjusted OR was 1.94 (95% CI: 1.86 to 2.02) for one disease, 2.93 (95% CI: 2.80 to 3.08) for two diseases, 4.07 (95% CI: 3.85 to 4.31) for three diseases, 5.46 (95% CI: 5.10 to 5.85) for four diseases and 9.08 (95% CI: 8.56 to 9.64) for 5 ≥ diseases. The association between multimorbidity and VTE was stronger in males OR 3.45 (3.29 to 3.62) than in females OR 2.91 (2.77 to 3.04). There were significant but mostly weak familial associations between multimorbidity in relatives and VTE.

CONCLUSIONS: Increasing multimorbidity exhibits a strong and increasing association with VTE. Familial associations suggest a weak shared familial susceptibility. The association between multimorbidity and VTE suggests that future cohort studies where multimorbidity is used to predict VTE might be worthwhile.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere072934
Pages (from-to)1-8
JournalBMJ Open
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023 Jun 16

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
  • Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Free keywords

  • Male
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Venous Thromboembolism/etiology
  • Sweden/epidemiology
  • Multimorbidity
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Risk Factors

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