Body composition, dietary protein and body weight regulation. Reconciling conflicting results from intervention and observational studies?

Mikkel Z Ankarfeldt, Lars Angquist, Tanja Stocks, Marianne U Jakobsen, Kim Overvad, Jytte Halkjær, Wim H M Saris, Arne Astrup, Thorkild I A Sørensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (SciVal)
68 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Physiological evidence indicates that high-protein diets reduce caloric intake and increase thermogenic response, which may prevent weight gain and regain after weight loss. Clinical trials have shown such effects, whereas observational cohort studies suggest an association between greater protein intake and weight gain. In both types of studies the results are based on average weight changes, and show considerable diversity in both directions. This study investigates whether the discrepancy in the evidence could be due to recruitment of overweight and obese individuals into clinical trials.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere101134
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Endocrinology and Diabetes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Body composition, dietary protein and body weight regulation. Reconciling conflicting results from intervention and observational studies?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this