Brain metastases--comparison of gadodiamide injection-enhanced MR imaging at standard and high dose, contrast-enhanced CT and non-contrast-enhanced MR imaging

Per Åkeson, Elna-Marie Larsson, D T Kristoffersen, E Jonsson, Stig Holtås

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim was to compare the abilities of contrast-enhanced CT, non-contrast-enhanced MR imaging and contrast-enhanced MR imaging using standard (0.1 mmol/kg b.w.) and high (0.3 mmol/kg b.w.) doses of Gadodiamide injection to detect brain metastases (i.e. blood-brain barrier damage). Sixteen patients with at least 2 metastases found by CT were evaluated by MR imaging using non-contrast-enhanced spin-echo, T1-weighted, T2-weighted sequences, and contrast-enhanced spin-echo T1-weighted sequences at 2 dose levels. Gadodiamide injection was first given at the dose of 0.1 mmol/kg b.w. After imaging, another 0.2 mmol/kg b.w. was given, yielding a cumulative dose of 0.3 mmol/kg b.w. No contrast media-related adverse events were recorded. The images were evaluated openly by one and blindly by 2 investigators and the number of metastases, size, delineation (open study) and diagnostic certainty (blind study) of each individual metastasis noted. High-dose MR imaging showed significantly more and smaller metastases than any other examination, and gave a higher diagnostic certainty. All high-dose images were superior to those with the standard dose MR imaging when compared blindly in pairs. We conclude that spin-echo MR imaging with a high dose of Gadodiamide injection is an efficient way to improve the detection of brain metastases, in particular of small ones.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)300-306
JournalActa Radiologica
Volume36
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1995

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging

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