Cystatin C predicts long term mortality better than creatinine in a nationwide study of intensive care patients

Johanna Helmersson-Karlqvist, Miklos Lipcsey, Johan Ärnlöv, Max Bell, Bo Ravn, Alain Dardashti, Anders Larsson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is linked to poor survival. The predictive value of creatinine estimated GFR (eGFR) and cystatin C eGFR in critically ill patients may differ substantially, but has been less studied. This study compares long-term mortality risk prediction by eGFR using a creatinine equation (CKD-EPI), a cystatin C equation (CAPA) and a combined creatinine/cystatin C equation (CKD-EPI), in 22,488 patients treated in intensive care at three University Hospitals in Sweden, between 2004 and 2015. Patients were analysed for both creatinine and cystatin C on the same blood sample tube at admission, using accredited laboratory methods. During follow-up (median 5.1 years) 8401 (37%) patients died. Reduced eGFR was significantly associated with death by all eGFR-equations in Cox regression models. However, patients reclassified to a lower GFR-category by using the cystatin C-based equation, as compared to the creatinine-based equation, had significantly higher mortality risk compared to the referent patients not reclassified. The cystatin C equation increased C-statistics for death prediction (p < 0.001 vs. creatinine, p = 0.013 vs. combined equation). In conclusion, this data favours the sole cystatin C equation rather than the creatinine or combined equations when estimating GFR for risk prediction purposes in critically ill patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5882
JournalScientific Reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
  • Urology and Nephrology

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