Economic stress in childhood and adulthood, and poor psychological health: Three life course hypotheses.

Martin Lindström, Maria Fridh, Maria Rosvall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (SciVal)
202 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Investigations of mental health in a life course perspective are scarce. The aim is to investigate associations between economic stress in childhood and adulthood, and poor psychological health in adulthood with reference to the accumulation, critical period and social mobility hypotheses in life course epidemiology. The 2008 public health survey in Skåne is a cross-sectional postal questionnaire study. A random sample was invited which yielded 28,198 respondents aged 18-80 (55% participation). Psychological health was assessed with the GHQ12 instrument. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the associations adjusting for age, country of birth, socioeconomic status, emotional support, instrumental support and trust, and stratifying by sex. The accumulation hypothesis was confirmed because combined childhood and adulthood exposures to economic stress were associated with poor psychological health in a graded manner. The social mobility hypothesis was also confirmed. The critical period hypothesis was not confirmed because both childhood and adulthood economic stress remained significantly associated with poor psychological health in adulthood. Economic stress in childhood is associated with mental health in adulthood.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)386-393
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume215
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Psychiatry

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Economic stress in childhood and adulthood, and poor psychological health: Three life course hypotheses.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this