Fracture of the radial head and neck of Mason types II and III during growth: a 14-25 year follow-up

J Malmvik, Pär Herbertsson, PO Josefsson, Ralph Hasserius, Jack Besjakov, Magnus Karlsson

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23 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Twenty-four individuals, who were 16 years of age or younger when they sustained a fracture of the radial head or neck, were examined at a mean of 19 years (range 14-25 years) after injury. The 12 girls and 12 boys were a mean age of 11 years (range 5-16 years) when the fracture was sustained. Two were excluded due to late resection of the radial head following persisting pain. The fractures, which were of Mason type II in 19 and type III in three cases, were treated by mobilization in eight cases, plaster in eight, open reduction and internal fixation in three and closed reduction and plaster in three. At the follow-up examination, 19 (86%) had no complaints, while three (14%) had occasional pain. Flexion was decreased in the formerly injured compared with the uninjured elbow (139 + 8degrees versus 142+/-5degrees; P<0.05). None had developed elbow osteoarthritis. Isolated, closed fracture of the radial head and neck during growth has a favourable, long-term outcome.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-68
JournalJournal of Pediatric Orthopedics. Part B
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Bibliographical note

The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015.
The record was previously connected to the following departments: Medical Radiology Unit (013241410), Clinical and Molecular Osteoporosis Research Unit (013242930), Reconstructive Surgery (013240300)

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Surgery
  • Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
  • Orthopedics

Keywords

  • children
  • fracture
  • long-term
  • radial neck
  • radial head

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