High resection rates of colorectal liver metastases after standardized follow-up and multimodal management: an outcome study within the COLOFOL trial

Peter Scherman, Pernilla Hansdotter, Erik Holmberg, Frank Viborg Mortensen, Sune H. Petersen, Magnus Rizell, Peter Naredi, Ingvar Syk, COLOFOL Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Outcome after colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) resection has improved over time, despite increased resection rates. Hence, it's crucial to identify all patients possible to treat with curative intent. The objectives of this study were to map recurrence pattern, treatment strategy and survival depending on treatment and follow-up strategy. Methods: In the COLOFOL-trial, patients with radically resected stage II-III colorectal cancer were randomized to high-frequency (6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months; HF) or low-frequency (12 and 36 months; LF) follow-up. In this study, all CRLM within 5 years were identified and medical files scrutinized. Overall survival (OS) was analysed in uni- and multivariable analyses. Primary endpoint was 5-year OS. Results: Of 2442 patients, 235 (9.6%) developed metachronous CRLM of which 123 (52.3%) underwent treatment with curative intent, resulting in 5-year OS of 58%. Five-year OS for patients with CRLM was 43% after HF versus 24% after LF. The survival benefit was confirmed for HF 8 years from resection of the primary tumour, HR 0.63 (CI 0.46–0.85). Conclusion: A high proportion of metachronous CRLM was possible to treat with curative intent, yielding high survival rates. More intense follow-up after colorectal cancer resection might be of value in high-risk patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)766-774
JournalHPB
Volume25
Issue number7
Early online date2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Cancer and Oncology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'High resection rates of colorectal liver metastases after standardized follow-up and multimodal management: an outcome study within the COLOFOL trial'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this