Investigating temporal relationships between rainfall, soil moisture and MODIS-derived NDVI and EVI for six sites in Africa

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Abstract

This study investigates temporal relationships between vegetation growth, rainfall, and soil moisture for six sites located in sub-Saharan and southern Africa for the period 2005-2009. Specifically, seasonal components of time series of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) composites from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and half-hourly in-situ rainfall and soil moisture data at different depths (5-200 cm) during the growing season were used in a lagged correlation analysis in order to understand how vegetation growth responds to rainfall and soil moisture across different sites. Results indicate that both vegetation indices are strongly related to soil moisture (EVI slightly stronger than NDVI) for the upper 1 m reaching maximum correlations when they lag soil moisture by 0-28 days. They respond to rainfall with a 24-32 day lag at the sub-Saharan sites, EVI slightly earlier than NDVI, but their response at the southern hemisphere sites is complex.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Dec 1
Event34th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment - The GEOSS Era: Towards Operational Environmental Monitoring - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: 2011 Apr 102011 Apr 15

Conference

Conference34th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment - The GEOSS Era: Towards Operational Environmental Monitoring
Country/TerritoryAustralia
CitySydney, NSW
Period2011/04/102011/04/15

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Physical Geography

Keywords

  • vegetation
  • soil moisture
  • hydrology
  • MODIS

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