Language impairment in Swedish bilingual children: a comparison between bilingual and monolingual children in Malmö.

Eva-Kristina Salameh, Ulrika Nettelbladt, Gisela Håkansson, B Gullberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

In this study two groups of children were compared, 192 bilingual and 246 monolingual, referred over a 12-mo period to University Hospital in Malmö for suspected language impairment. Compared with monolingual children, bilingual children ran a significantly lower risk (RR = 0.76, p < 0.0001) of being referred by a child health centre, and a significantly higher risk (RR= 1.54, p < 0.0103) of being referred after 5 y of age. In the bilingual group there was also a significantly higher risk of parental refusal of assessment (RR = 2.35, p < 0.0016) and of the children being diagnosed with a severe language impairment (RR = 1.87, p < 0.0009). The risk for bilingual children with severe language impairment being discharged owing to non-attendance was high (RR = 6.20, p < 0.0002) compared to monolingual children. The risk increased with severity of language impairment. CONCLUSION: Bilingual children displayed a higher risk of a diagnosis of severe language impairment and of being discharged for non-attendance. The problem of low compliance among bilingual parents, despite strong indications of parental distress, must be addressed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229-234
JournalActa Pædiatrica
Volume91
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Bibliographical note

The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015.
The record was previously connected to the following departments: Linguistics and Phonetics (015010003), Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology (013020000)

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Pediatrics

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