Longitudinal vibration interferes with cross-bridge attachment and prevents muscle fibre shrinkage under PSE-like conditions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

The impact of longitudinal vibration on cross-bridge attachments between myofilaments was investigated in single fibres and intact muscle. Sinusoidal length vibration (frequency 50 Hz, amplitude 5% of fibre length) reduced active force by 40% when fibres were activated by elevation of [Ca2+], but did not alter the force when fibres were in rigor state. When vibrated for 30 min in rigor at pH 5.5 and 38 °C (PSE conditions), the lateral shrinkage of the fibres was significantly reduced, suggesting a potential positive influence of vibration on water-holding capacity. In whole muscle incubated at 38 °C until 8 h post mortem, the progress of rigor onset was accessed by measuring the increase in muscle stiffness. Vibration applied 3-5 h post mortem postponed rigor development, but did not have significant influence on water-holding capacity compared with non-vibrated conditions. In conclusion, the results suggest that muscle vibration can be a future technique to delay rigor development and prevent muscle fibre shrinkage and PSE development after slaughter.

Original languageEnglish
Article number108558
JournalMeat Science
Volume179
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Physiology

Keywords

  • PSE
  • Rigor bonds
  • Rigor onset
  • Water-holding capacity

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Longitudinal vibration interferes with cross-bridge attachment and prevents muscle fibre shrinkage under PSE-like conditions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this