Male Circumcision and Serologically Determined Human Papillomavirus Infection in a Birth Cohort

Nigel P. Dickson, Janka Ryding, Thea van Roode, Charlotte Paul, Peter Herbison, Joakim Dillner, David C. G. Skegg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Circumcision has been reported to protect against infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) in men, but results have been inconsistent. We followed males in a birth cohort born in Dunedin, New Zealand, in 1972 and 1973 from age 3 to 32 years. Seropositivity at age 32 years for the oncogenic types HPV-16 and 18, and the nononcogenic types 6 and 11, was studied in relation to maternal reports of circumcision status at age 3 for 450 men. Seropositivity to any of these types was associated with lifetime number of sexual partners (P = 0.03), and lower moral-religious emphasis of the family of origin (P < 0.001). Circumcision was not found to be protective, with the adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for HPV6/11/16/18 seropositivity among the circumcised compared with the uncircumcised being 1.4 (0.89-2.2).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-183
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Cancer and Oncology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Male Circumcision and Serologically Determined Human Papillomavirus Infection in a Birth Cohort'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this