Maternal Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus infections and risk of testicular cancer in the offspring: a nested case-control study

Katsiaryna Holl, Helja-Marja Surcel, Pentti Koskela, Joakim Dillner, Goran Hallmans, Goran Wadell, Marjo Kaasila, Gudridur H. Olafsdottir, Helga M. Ogmundsdottir, Eero Pukkala, Par Stattin, Matti Lehtinen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

During recent decades the incidence of testicular cancer (TC) has increased rapidly around the world. Associated exogenous etiological factors might therefore be identifiable. We performed a case-control study nested within Finnish, Swedish and Icelandic maternity cohorts exploiting early pregnancy serum samples to evaluate the role of congenital or neonatal infections with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) as risk factors of TC in the offspring. For each case-index mother pair, three or four matched control-control mother pairs were identified using national population registries. First trimester sera were retrieved from the index mothers of 66 TC cases and 258 matched control mothers and were tested for antibodies to EBV and CMV. High level of maternal EBV IgG antibodies was associated with significantly increased risk of TC in the offspring (odds ratio (OR) 2.50; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15, 5.40), especially with risk of non-seminoma TC (OR, 2.73: 95% CI, 1.25, 5.99) and non-seminoma TC diagnosed under 8 years of age(OR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.05, 7.04). In contrast, offspring of CMV IgG-seropositive mothers had a decreased risk of TC diagnosed under 8 years of age (OR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.14, 0.89). Our results suggest that EBV and CMV infections may be associated with TC.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)816-822
JournalAPMIS : acta pathologica, microbiologica, et immunologica Scandinavica
Volume116
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Microbiology in the medical area

Free keywords

  • testicular
  • cytomegalovirus
  • maternal infection
  • Epstein-Barr virus
  • cancer
  • offspring

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