Odegaard's selection hypothesis revisited: Schizophrenia in Surinamese immigrants to the Netherlands

JP Selten, Elizabeth Cantor-Graae, J Slaets, RS Kahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective. The incidence of schizophrenia among Surinamese immigrants to the Netherlands is high. The authors tested Odegaard's hypothesis that this phenomenon is explained by selective migration. Method: The authors imagined that migration from Surinam to the Netherlands subsumed the entire population of Surinam and not solely individuals at risk for schizophrenia, They compared the risk of a first admission to a Dutch mental hospital for schizophrenia from 1983 to 1992 for Surinamese-born immigrants to the risk for Dutch-born individuals, using the Surinamese-born population in the Netherlands and the population of Surinam combined as the denominator for the immigrants. Results: The age- and sex-adjusted relative risk of schizophrenia for the Surinamese-born immigrants was 1.46. Conclusions: Selective migration cannot solely explain the higher incidence of schizophrenia in Surinamese immigrants to the Netherlands.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)669-671
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume159
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Psychiatry

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