Perceptions of surveillance with magnetic resonance imaging among women with a hereditary risk of breast cancer—A phenomenographic study

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Abstract

Aim
To explore perceptions of annual surveillance with magnetic resonance imaging and perceptions of care during the examination among women with a hereditary risk of breast cancer.
Design
Phenomenography.
Methods
Fourteen face-to-face interviews using a semi-structured interview guide were conducted among women undergoing surveillance in the southern region of Sweden. A seven-step phenomenographic analysis with investigator triangulation was performed.
Results
‘Considering own risk of developing breast cancer’, ‘Entrusting oneself to surveillance’ and ‘Living in a cycle’ represented descriptive categories of perceptions. Family narratives introduced comprehension of own risk of breast cancer, followed by appraisal of own benefits of participating in surveillance. Entrusting oneself to surveillance included handing over management of diagnostic examinations and dealing with practical issues and diverse emotions related to surveillance. Planning life based around surveillance, struggling with fluctuating emotions, also between the examinations and questioning own identity implied the perception of living in a cycle.
Conclusion
Surveillance for hereditary breast cancer implies living in a cycle of dealing with fluctuating emotions and planning life based around surveillance. Comprehension of one's own risk for breast cancer arises from awareness in the family. Women value the surveillance programme and trust the healthcare system.
Implication for the Profession and Patient Care
Knowledge of women's perceptions of the surveillance programme and care is vital for supporting women in their decision-making on attendance and providing person-centred care during surveillance.
Impact
A gap in explorative studies from the perspective of the individual woman in the context of surveillance for breast cancer and care in magnetic resonance imaging in surveillance was addressed. ‘Considering own risk of developing breast cancer’, ‘Entrusting oneself to surveillance’ and ‘Living in a cycle’ represented women's perceptions of surveillance and care. The study results have implications for person-centred care among women in the surveillance programme.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Advanced Nursing
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2024 Feb 21

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Nursing
  • Cancer and Oncology

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