Population dynamics of dominant dinoflagellate species in the North Sea: in situ growth rates, photosynthetic potential, and losses due to parasitism

Eva Pérez Blanco, Paulo Sérgio Salomon, Per Carlsson, Cathérine Legrand, Edna Granéli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In the North Sea, Tripos and Dinophysis are commonly occurring mixotrophic planktonic dinoflagellate genera. In order to understand their bloom dynamics, an occurring bloom dominated by T. furca and D. norvegica was followed for several days. High cell abundances of these species were located to estimate: in situ growth rates from cell cycle analyses, depth distributions, growth rates sustained by photosynthesis, and parasite infection prevalence in all T. furca, T. fusus, D. norvegica and D. acuminata. Cell abundances were over 10000 cells L−1 for T. furca and up to 18000 cells L−1 for D. norvegica. Cells accumulated between 15-25 m depth and presented low specific in situ growth rates of 0.04-0.15 d−1 for T. furca and 0.02-0.16 d−1 for D. norvegica. Photosynthesis could sustain growth rates of 0.01-0.18 d−1 for T. furca and 0.02 to 0.14 d−1 for D. norvegica, suggesting that these species were relying mainly on photosynthesis. Parasite infections where generally low, with occasional high prevalence in D. norvegica (by Parvilucifera sp.) and T. fusus (by Amoebophrya sp.), while both parasites showed comparable prevalence in D. acuminata, which could offset in situ growth rates by parasite-induced host mortality. The restructuring effect of parasites on dinoflagellate blooms is often overlooked and this study elucidates their effect to cell abundances and their growth at the final stages of a bloom.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102604
Number of pages10
JournalHarmful Algae
Volume134
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024 Apr

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Ecology

Free keywords

  • Dinophysis
  • in situ growth rates
  • North Sea
  • parasites
  • photosynthesis
  • Tripos

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