Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the antennal sensilla in therare saproxylic beetle Elater ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Elateridae)

Agnese Zauli, Emanuela Maurizi, Guiseppe M Carpaneto, Stefano Chiari, E Merivee, Glenn Svensson, Andrea Di Giulio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

This work provides the first morphological analysis (both at gross and fine level) of the antennal structures in the genus
Elater (Coleoptera, Elateridae). The typology, number and distribution patterns of the antennal sensilla in the rare saproxylic
Elater ferrugineus (both male and female) were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The serrate antennae of
E. ferrugineus consisted of a scape, a pedicel, and nine flattened flagellomeres. Overall, 10 types of sensilla were identified
according to their morphological features: one type of sensilla chaetica (Ch), one type of Böhm sensilla (Bo), three types of
sensilla trichodea (Tr.1–3), two types of sensilla basiconica (Ba.1–2), one type of sensilla styloconica (St), one type of
grooved peg sensilla (Gp) and one type of sensilla campaniformia (Ca). A marked sexual dimorphism was found at both
gross and fine scale. The male antenna was bigger (8.6 mm) than the female one (7.0 mm) and carried one type of sensilla
trichodea (Tr.2) absent in female antennae possibly responsible for reception of the female-emitted sex pheromone. The
female antenna carried a higher number of sensilla (~ 9800) than the male one did (~7,000), with more abundant sensilla
chaetica (Ch) and basiconica (Ba.1 and Ba.2).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)338-350
Number of pages13
JournalItalian Journal of Zoology
Volume83
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Zoology

Keywords

  • cuticular microstructures,
  • fine morphology,

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the antennal sensilla in therare saproxylic beetle Elater ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Elateridae)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this