Seeing the nomads like a state: Sweden and the sámi at the turn of the last century

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Abstract

In modern history, states have typically attempted to eliminate nomadism. Perhaps uniquely, Sweden reinforced nomadism among some of its Sámi population. In this chapter, I argue that the reason for this was twofold. First, reindeer herding necessitated nomadism, and it was thought to be the only economic contribution parts of the traditional Sámi land could provide. Second, a discourse of Borealism romanticized the Sámi and allowed them to be a contained element of Swedish national identity, rather than a threat to it.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNomad-State Relationships in International Relations
Subtitle of host publicationBefore and After Borders
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages123-145
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)9783030280536
ISBN (Print)9783030280529
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalization Studies)

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