Social capital, desire to increase physical activity and leisure-time physical activity: A population-based study.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
To investigate the associations between social capital (trust) and leisure-time physical activity.

STUDY DESIGN:
The 2004 Public Health Survey in Skåne is a cross-sectional study.

METHODS:
In total, 27,757 individuals aged 18-80 years answered a postal questionnaire (59% participation). Logistic regression models were used to investigate the associations between trust, desire to increase physical activity and leisure-time physical activity.

RESULTS:
The prevalence of low leisure-time physical activity was 15.3% among men and 13.2% among women. Middle-aged men and older women, respondents born abroad, those with medium/low education, those with the desire to increase physical activity but needing support, and those reporting low trust had significantly higher odds ratios of low leisure-time physical activity than their respective reference groups. The associations between low trust and desire to increase physical activity and between low trust and low leisure-time physical activity remained in the multiple models.

CONCLUSIONS:
The positive association between low trust and low leisure-time physical activity remained after multiple adjustments. There is a concentration of men and women with low leisure-time physical activity who report the desire to increase their physical activity but think that they need support to do so. This group also has a significantly higher prevalence of low trust.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)442-447
JournalPublic Health
Volume125
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

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