Substantial hysteresis in emergent temperature sensitivity of global wetland CH4 emissions

Kuang Yu Chang, William J. Riley, Sara H. Knox, Robert B. Jackson, Gavin McNicol, Benjamin Poulter, Mika Aurela, Dennis Baldocchi, Sheel Bansal, Gil Bohrer, David I. Campbell, Alessandro Cescatti, Housen Chu, Kyle B. Delwiche, Ankur R. Desai, Eugenie Euskirchen, Thomas Friborg, Mathias Goeckede, Manuel Helbig, Kyle S. HemesTakashi Hirano, Hiroki Iwata, Minseok Kang, Trevor Keenan, Ken W. Krauss, Annalea Lohila, Ivan Mammarella, Bhaskar Mitra, Akira Miyata, Mats B. Nilsson, Asko Noormets, Walter C. Oechel, Dario Papale, Matthias Peichl, Michele L. Reba, Janne Rinne, Benjamin R.K. Runkle, Youngryel Ryu, Torsten Sachs, Karina V.R. Schäfer, Hans Peter Schmid, Narasinha Shurpali, Oliver Sonnentag, Angela C.I. Tang, Margaret S. Torn, Carlo Trotta, Eeva Stiina Tuittila, Masahito Ueyama, Rodrigo Vargas, Timo Vesala, Lisamarie Windham-Myers, Zhen Zhang, Donatella Zona

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Wetland methane (CH4) emissions ([Formula: see text]) are important in global carbon budgets and climate change assessments. Currently, [Formula: see text] projections rely on prescribed static temperature sensitivity that varies among biogeochemical models. Meta-analyses have proposed a consistent [Formula: see text] temperature dependence across spatial scales for use in models; however, site-level studies demonstrate that [Formula: see text] are often controlled by factors beyond temperature. Here, we evaluate the relationship between [Formula: see text] and temperature using observations from the FLUXNET-CH4 database. Measurements collected across the globe show substantial seasonal hysteresis between [Formula: see text] and temperature, suggesting larger [Formula: see text] sensitivity to temperature later in the frost-free season (about 77% of site-years). Results derived from a machine-learning model and several regression models highlight the importance of representing the large spatial and temporal variability within site-years and ecosystem types. Mechanistic advancements in biogeochemical model parameterization and detailed measurements in factors modulating CH4 production are thus needed to improve global CH4 budget assessments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2266
Number of pages1
JournalNature Communications
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Apr 15

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Physical Geography
  • Climate Research

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