Using brain imaging to measure emotional response to product appearance

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Abstract

Brain imaging systems are a set of techniques that allow visualizing the regions of the brain that are activated when (emotional) stimuli are presented. Their advantage over traditional methods of measuring emotion, like self-reports is that they leave out response biases. This paper presents what brain imaging measurement can do for emotional design. It also reviews the brain imaging studies that have been performed in the field of emotional design. Very few such studies were found, and they were dispersed among different disciplines: design, marketing, advertising, human-computer interaction. One of the results of that investigation is that the complexity of brain imaging systems and of designing adequate experimental setups imply that brain imaging be reserved for some very specific purposes, like obtaining the very first impression of a product design.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 4th International Conference on Designing Pleasurable Products and Interfaces - DPPI'09
EditorsAnne Guéand
Place of PublicationCompiègne, France
PublisherUniversité de Technologie de Compiègne (UTC)
Pages187-198
Number of pages12
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Event4th International Conference on Designing Pleasurable Products and Interfaces - DPPI'09 - Compiègne, France
Duration: 2009 Oct 132009 Oct 16

Conference

Conference4th International Conference on Designing Pleasurable Products and Interfaces - DPPI'09
Country/TerritoryFrance
CityCompiègne
Period2009/10/132009/10/16

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics

Keywords

  • machine design
  • physiological measurement
  • brain imaging
  • emotional design
  • emotion measurement
  • maskinkonstruktion

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