When women can be stars in sports, why is it so difficult in sports and exercise medicine research?

Kristina Fagher, Evert Verhagen

Research output: Contribution to journalDebate/Note/Editorialpeer-review

Abstract

Watching the Olympic and Paralympics Games, we notice that both men and women achieve world-class performances. We see the world’s best sports stars perform extraordinary athletic feats, regardless of who they are or where they come from. This equity was not always present at this world stage. For instance, until 1984, women were prohibited from running marathons during the Olympic Games.1 It may also surprise you that it was not until the 2012 London Games that all delegations sent a team consisting of both sexes.

Over the last decades, the Olympic and Paralympic movements have worked proactively for equity through leadership development and advocacy campaigns, leading to opportunities for women to also become sports stars. Nonetheless, it appears that we in Sports and Exercise Medicine (SEM) are falling behind. Although most of us aim for equity and equivalence, women are still heavily underrepresented in SEM research. In this editorial, we discuss existing concerns and possible solutions.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere001218
JournalBMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Jan 3

Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Sport and Fitness Sciences

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'When women can be stars in sports, why is it so difficult in sports and exercise medicine research?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this