Rumours, gossip and scandals: A study of royal concubines and journalistic methods

Project: Research

Layman's description

By investigating the three historic, royal media scandals, the aim is to study a widely used oral working for journalists scientifically so far met with limited attention, ie gossip and rumours.

Through investigating the three historic, royal media scandals, the purpose is to study a widely used oral method for journalists, a method that scientifically so far has met limited attention, ie gossip and rumours. The study examines the relationship between the rumour, gossip and journalistic work, and partly even gossip as a journalistic approach, where the scandal is our entrance.

To do this, the survey covers three case studies from 1900, the mid 1900s and the turn of 2000. The case studies all have a royal theme. The reason is that the royal family both is and has been the subject of intense gossip and media coverage but also that the publication of certain events related to the royal family itself may have scandalous aspects. The three case studies are referred to as the King and Coffee Girls (2010), The Haijby affair (1930s, 40s and 50s) and Oscar II's mistresses (the late 1800s).

The point of examining these three scandals is that they at different times invite us to highlight the media system, mass media technologies, varying pressure ethical requirements and ties between the royal family and the media. All media scandals are well known, described and investigated scientifically, in popular historical and mass media. The emphasis of this investigation is how the gossip, rumour and media news production work in a kind of symbiosis.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date2015/01/012017/12/31

Participants