A Brief Breathing Space: Experiences of Brief Admission by Self-Referral for Self-Harming and Suicidal Individuals with a History of Extensive Psychiatric Inpatient Care

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Brief Breathing Space

T2 - Experiences of Brief Admission by Self-Referral for Self-Harming and Suicidal Individuals with a History of Extensive Psychiatric Inpatient Care

AU - Lindkvist, Rose Marie

AU - Westling, Sofie

AU - Liljedahl, Sophie I.

AU - Landgren, Kajsa

PY - 2020/8/7

Y1 - 2020/8/7

N2 - Individuals with severe self-harm and experiences of lengthy psychiatric admissions often have complex mental health conditions and are at risk of suicide. In this qualitative study, self-harming individuals with >180 days of psychiatric admission over 12 months shared their experiences of Brief Admission (BA), a standardized crisis-management intervention encouraging self-admission and autonomy. Phenomenological hermeneutic analysis formulated BA as a worthy respite, replacing an old system of having to prove need ‘in blood’ or wait and get worse. Successes and struggles in early help-seeking, interpreted in the light of human rights and person-centered care, suggested that individual development of autonomy depended on perceived focus on recovery and compassion. Future research may consider ethical and health-economic aspects of BA in a broader perspective.

AB - Individuals with severe self-harm and experiences of lengthy psychiatric admissions often have complex mental health conditions and are at risk of suicide. In this qualitative study, self-harming individuals with >180 days of psychiatric admission over 12 months shared their experiences of Brief Admission (BA), a standardized crisis-management intervention encouraging self-admission and autonomy. Phenomenological hermeneutic analysis formulated BA as a worthy respite, replacing an old system of having to prove need ‘in blood’ or wait and get worse. Successes and struggles in early help-seeking, interpreted in the light of human rights and person-centered care, suggested that individual development of autonomy depended on perceived focus on recovery and compassion. Future research may consider ethical and health-economic aspects of BA in a broader perspective.

U2 - 10.1080/01612840.2020.1789787

DO - 10.1080/01612840.2020.1789787

M3 - Article

C2 - 32762578

AN - SCOPUS:85089194997

JO - Issues in Mental Health Nursing

JF - Issues in Mental Health Nursing

SN - 1096-4673

ER -