A decrease in maxillary sinus pressure, as seen in upper airway allergy or infection, results in an increase in upper airway nitric oxide levels.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bibtex

@article{a34dea5c65cb4810a2a4cba5c93b963a,
title = "A decrease in maxillary sinus pressure, as seen in upper airway allergy or infection, results in an increase in upper airway nitric oxide levels.",
keywords = "Adult, Airway Resistance, Atmosphere Exposure Chambers, Female, Human, Male, Maxillary Sinus: physiology, Non-U.S. Gov't, Nitric Oxide: metabolism, Pressure, Respiratory Hypersensitivity: physiopathology, Respiratory Tract Infections: physiopathology, Rhinomanometry, Support",
author = "Andersson, {Jens A} and Anders Cervin and Sven Lindberg and Rolf Uddman and Lars-Olaf Cardell",
year = "2002",
doi = "10.1080/00016480260092336",
language = "English",
volume = "122",
pages = "520--523",
journal = "Acta Oto-Laryngologica",
issn = "1651-2251",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "5",

}