A high-beef diet alter protein kinase C isozyme expression in rat colonic mucosa.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

A high-beef diet alter protein kinase C isozyme expression in rat colonic mucosa. / Pajari, Anne-Maria; Oikarinen , SI; Duan, Rui-Dong; Mutanen, Marja.

In: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, Vol. 11, No. 10, 2000, p. 474-481.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Pajari, Anne-Maria ; Oikarinen , SI ; Duan, Rui-Dong ; Mutanen, Marja. / A high-beef diet alter protein kinase C isozyme expression in rat colonic mucosa. In: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. 2000 ; Vol. 11, No. 10. pp. 474-481.

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A high-beef diet alter protein kinase C isozyme expression in rat colonic mucosa.

AU - Pajari, Anne-Maria

AU - Oikarinen , SI

AU - Duan, Rui-Dong

AU - Mutanen, Marja

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - We recently reported that a red meat (beef) diet relative to a casein-based diet increases protein kinase C (PKC) activity in rat colonic mucosa. The purpose of this study was to further elucidate the effects of a high-beef diet on colonic intracellular signal transduction by analyzing steady-state protein levels of different PKC isozymes as well as activities of the three types of sphingomyelinases. Male Wistar rats (n = 12/group) were fed AIN93G-based diets either high in beef or casein for 4 weeks. Rats fed the beef diet had significantly (P < 0.05) higher cytosolic PKC α and lower membrane PKC δ protein levels than rats fed the casein diet. The beef-fed rats also had alterations in subfractions of PKC ζ/λ so that they had a significantly (P = 0.001) lower level of membrane 70 & 75 kDa fraction and a higher (P = 0.001) level of cytosolic 40 & 43 kDa fraction than rats fed the casein diet. Because protein levels analyzed with a PKC ζ-specific antibody were similar, these differences in PKC ζ/λ were probably due to changes in PKC λ expression. PKC β2 levels did not differ between the dietary groups. Diet had no significant effect on the activity of acid, neutral, or alkaline sphingomyelinase. This study demonstrated that consumption of a high-beef diet is capable of modulating PKC isozyme levels in rat colon, which might be one of the mechanisms whereby red meat affects colon carcinogenesis.

AB - We recently reported that a red meat (beef) diet relative to a casein-based diet increases protein kinase C (PKC) activity in rat colonic mucosa. The purpose of this study was to further elucidate the effects of a high-beef diet on colonic intracellular signal transduction by analyzing steady-state protein levels of different PKC isozymes as well as activities of the three types of sphingomyelinases. Male Wistar rats (n = 12/group) were fed AIN93G-based diets either high in beef or casein for 4 weeks. Rats fed the beef diet had significantly (P < 0.05) higher cytosolic PKC α and lower membrane PKC δ protein levels than rats fed the casein diet. The beef-fed rats also had alterations in subfractions of PKC ζ/λ so that they had a significantly (P = 0.001) lower level of membrane 70 & 75 kDa fraction and a higher (P = 0.001) level of cytosolic 40 & 43 kDa fraction than rats fed the casein diet. Because protein levels analyzed with a PKC ζ-specific antibody were similar, these differences in PKC ζ/λ were probably due to changes in PKC λ expression. PKC β2 levels did not differ between the dietary groups. Diet had no significant effect on the activity of acid, neutral, or alkaline sphingomyelinase. This study demonstrated that consumption of a high-beef diet is capable of modulating PKC isozyme levels in rat colon, which might be one of the mechanisms whereby red meat affects colon carcinogenesis.

U2 - 10.1016/S0955-2863(00)00100-5

DO - 10.1016/S0955-2863(00)00100-5

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 474

EP - 481

JO - Nutrition Reports International

T2 - Nutrition Reports International

JF - Nutrition Reports International

SN - 1873-4847

IS - 10

ER -