Abnormal Metabolism of γ-Trace Alkaline Microprotein: The Basic Defect in Hereditary Cerebral Hemorrhage with Amyloidosis

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Abnormal Metabolism of γ-Trace Alkaline Microprotein : The Basic Defect in Hereditary Cerebral Hemorrhage with Amyloidosis. / Grubb, Anders; Jensson, Olafur; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Arnason, Alfred; Löfberg, Helge; Malm, Johan.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 311, No. 24, 13.12.1984, p. 1547-1549.

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Grubb, Anders ; Jensson, Olafur ; Gudmundsson, Gunnar ; Arnason, Alfred ; Löfberg, Helge ; Malm, Johan. / Abnormal Metabolism of γ-Trace Alkaline Microprotein : The Basic Defect in Hereditary Cerebral Hemorrhage with Amyloidosis. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1984 ; Vol. 311, No. 24. pp. 1547-1549.

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Abnormal Metabolism of γ-Trace Alkaline Microprotein

T2 - The Basic Defect in Hereditary Cerebral Hemorrhage with Amyloidosis

AU - Grubb, Anders

AU - Jensson, Olafur

AU - Gudmundsson, Gunnar

AU - Arnason, Alfred

AU - Löfberg, Helge

AU - Malm, Johan

PY - 1984/12/13

Y1 - 1984/12/13

N2 - ALTHOUGH the total incidence of cerebral hemorrhage is high, comparatively few reports concerning the familial occurrence of this disease have been published.1,2 In 1935 Arnason described 10 families with a high incidence of cerebral hemorrhage and concluded that a hereditary form of the disease was present in these families.3 Further clinicopathological investigations of the disease revealed an autosomal dominant inheritance and a connection between the disease and a special form of amyloidosis confined to the cerebral vasculature.4 This type of cerebral hemorrhage is therefore generally referred to as hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis. Recently, the fibrillar components of the amyloid.

AB - ALTHOUGH the total incidence of cerebral hemorrhage is high, comparatively few reports concerning the familial occurrence of this disease have been published.1,2 In 1935 Arnason described 10 families with a high incidence of cerebral hemorrhage and concluded that a hereditary form of the disease was present in these families.3 Further clinicopathological investigations of the disease revealed an autosomal dominant inheritance and a connection between the disease and a special form of amyloidosis confined to the cerebral vasculature.4 This type of cerebral hemorrhage is therefore generally referred to as hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis. Recently, the fibrillar components of the amyloid.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0021706934&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1056/NEJM198412133112406

DO - 10.1056/NEJM198412133112406

M3 - Article

VL - 311

SP - 1547

EP - 1549

JO - New England Journal of Medicine

JF - New England Journal of Medicine

SN - 0028-4793

IS - 24

ER -