Acupuncture treatment of pregnant women with low back and pelvic pain - an intervention study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To describe patients' experience of acupuncture treatment in low back and pelvic pain during pregnancy. Design: An intervention study carried out between September 2000 and December 2001, involving 40 pregnant women. Participants: The study population consisted of healthy pregnant women presenting with low back and pelvic pain at maternity health care centres within a defined area in southern Sweden. Intervention: Two groups of women received acupuncture treatment from gestational week 20 (group 1) or week 26 (group 2) respectively, for a period of 6 weeks divided into eight sessions of 30 minutes each. Measurements: Pain assessment was carried out using Pain-O-Meter and visual analogue scale (POM-VAS), Short-Form McGill Questionnaire (SF-MPQ), Short-Form-36: Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36), followed by telephone interviews 2-3 months after delivery. Findings: The results of POM-VAS, SF-MPQ and SF-36 showed a relief of pain in both groups. In group 2, an improvement in several SF-36 variables was noted in spite of increased physical restrictions. Telephone interviews confirmed that expectations of treatment were fulfilled. Using content analysis the main category, limitations in daily life, was identified, with subcategories pain, and psychological well-being. Conclusion: It may be advantageous to begin acupuncture therapy later in pregnancy to maximise pain relief.

Details

Authors
  • Lena Ekdahl
  • Kerstin Petersson
Organisations
Research areas and keywords

Subject classification (UKÄ) – MANDATORY

  • Nursing

Keywords

  • Short-Form McGill Questionnaire, SF-36, pregnancy, posterior pain, Pain-O-Meter, experiences, low back pain
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-182
JournalScandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Volume24
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes

Bibliographic note

The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Division of Nursing (Closed 2012) (013065000)