Ambivalent stereotypes link to peace, conflict and inequality across 38 nations

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Ambivalent stereotypes link to peace, conflict and inequality across 38 nations. / Durante, Federica; Fiske, Susan T; Gelfand, Michele; Crippa, Franca; Suttora, Chiara; Stillwell, Amelia; Asbrock, Frank; Aycan, Zeynep; Bye, Hege H; Carlsson, Rickard; Björklund, Fredrik; Daghir, Munqith; Geller, Armando; Larsen, Christian Albrekt; Latif, Hamid; Mähönen, Tuuli Anna; Jasinskaja-Lahti, Inga; Teymoori, Ali.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 4, 2017, p. 669–674.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Durante, F, Fiske, ST, Gelfand, M, Crippa, F, Suttora, C, Stillwell, A, Asbrock, F, Aycan, Z, Bye, HH, Carlsson, R, Björklund, F, Daghir, M, Geller, A, Larsen, CA, Latif, H, Mähönen, TA, Jasinskaja-Lahti, I & Teymoori, A 2017, 'Ambivalent stereotypes link to peace, conflict and inequality across 38 nations', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 114, no. 4, pp. 669–674. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1611874114

APA

Durante, F., Fiske, S. T., Gelfand, M., Crippa, F., Suttora, C., Stillwell, A., ... Teymoori, A. (2017). Ambivalent stereotypes link to peace, conflict and inequality across 38 nations. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114(4), 669–674. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1611874114

CBE

Durante F, Fiske ST, Gelfand M, Crippa F, Suttora C, Stillwell A, Asbrock F, Aycan Z, Bye HH, Carlsson R, Björklund F, Daghir M, Geller A, Larsen CA, Latif H, Mähönen TA, Jasinskaja-Lahti I, Teymoori A. 2017. Ambivalent stereotypes link to peace, conflict and inequality across 38 nations. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 114(4):669–674. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1611874114

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Durante, Federica ; Fiske, Susan T ; Gelfand, Michele ; Crippa, Franca ; Suttora, Chiara ; Stillwell, Amelia ; Asbrock, Frank ; Aycan, Zeynep ; Bye, Hege H ; Carlsson, Rickard ; Björklund, Fredrik ; Daghir, Munqith ; Geller, Armando ; Larsen, Christian Albrekt ; Latif, Hamid ; Mähönen, Tuuli Anna ; Jasinskaja-Lahti, Inga ; Teymoori, Ali. / Ambivalent stereotypes link to peace, conflict and inequality across 38 nations. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 2017 ; Vol. 114, No. 4. pp. 669–674.

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ambivalent stereotypes link to peace, conflict and inequality across 38 nations

AU - Durante, Federica

AU - Fiske, Susan T

AU - Gelfand, Michele

AU - Crippa, Franca

AU - Suttora, Chiara

AU - Stillwell, Amelia

AU - Asbrock, Frank

AU - Aycan, Zeynep

AU - Bye, Hege H

AU - Carlsson, Rickard

AU - Björklund, Fredrik

AU - Daghir, Munqith

AU - Geller, Armando

AU - Larsen, Christian Albrekt

AU - Latif, Hamid

AU - Mähönen, Tuuli Anna

AU - Jasinskaja-Lahti, Inga

AU - Teymoori, Ali

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - A cross-national study, 49 samples in 38 nations, N=4,344, investigates whether national peace and conflict reflect ambivalent warmth-competence stereotypes: High-conflict societies (Pakistan) may need clearcut, unambivalent group images-distinguishing friends from foes. Highly peaceful countries (Denmark) also may need less ambivalence because most groups occupy the shared national identity, with only a few outcasts. Finally, nations with intermediate conflict (U.S.) may need ambivalence to justify more complex intergroup-system stability. Using the Global Peace Index to measure conflict, a curvilinear (quadratic) relationship between ambivalence and conflict highlights how both extremely peaceful and extremely conflictual countries display lower stereotype ambivalence, whereas countries intermediate on peace-conflictpresent higher ambivalence. These data also replicated a linear inequality-ambivalence relationship.

AB - A cross-national study, 49 samples in 38 nations, N=4,344, investigates whether national peace and conflict reflect ambivalent warmth-competence stereotypes: High-conflict societies (Pakistan) may need clearcut, unambivalent group images-distinguishing friends from foes. Highly peaceful countries (Denmark) also may need less ambivalence because most groups occupy the shared national identity, with only a few outcasts. Finally, nations with intermediate conflict (U.S.) may need ambivalence to justify more complex intergroup-system stability. Using the Global Peace Index to measure conflict, a curvilinear (quadratic) relationship between ambivalence and conflict highlights how both extremely peaceful and extremely conflictual countries display lower stereotype ambivalence, whereas countries intermediate on peace-conflictpresent higher ambivalence. These data also replicated a linear inequality-ambivalence relationship.

KW - stereotypes

KW - peace

KW - conflict

KW - inequality

KW - ambivalence

U2 - 10.1073/pnas.1611874114

DO - 10.1073/pnas.1611874114

M3 - Article

VL - 114

SP - 669

EP - 674

JO - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

T2 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

SN - 1091-6490

IS - 4

ER -