Apo-lipoproteins, lipids and risk of cancer.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The epidemiological evidence for an obesity-cancer association is solid, whereas the association between obesity-associated lipoprotein levels and cancer is less evident. We investigated circulating levels of Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1), Apolipoprotein B (ApoB), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and association to risk of overall cancer and common cancer forms. The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study, a population-based prospective cohort study, enrolled 17,035 women and 11,063 men (1991-1996). Incident cancer cases were ascertained by record linkage with the Swedish Cancer Registry until end of follow-up, Jan 1(st) 2012. Baseline serum levels of ApoA1 and ApoB were analyzed for the entire cohort, and HDL-C and LDL-C levels in 5,281 participants. Hazard ratios, with 95% confidence interval, were calculated using Cox's proportional hazards analysis. In the entire cohort, none of the exposures were related to overall cancer risk (HRadj ApoA1=0.98, 95%CI: 0.95,1.01; HRadj ApoB=1.01, 95%CI: 0.98-1.04). Among men, ApoB was positively associated with cancer risk (HRadj ApoB=1.06, 95%CI: 1.01,1.10). Female breast cancer risk was inversely associated with ApoB (HRadj =0.92, 95%CI: 0.86,0.99). Among both genders, ApoA1 was inversely associated with lung cancer risk (HRadj =0.88, 95%CI: 0.80,0.97), whereas high ApoB increased lung cancer risk (HRadj =1.08, 95%CI: 0.99,1.18). Colorectal cancer risk was increased with high ApoB (HRadj =1.08, 95%CI: 1.01,1.16) among both genders. Apolipoprotein levels were not associated with prostate cancer incidence. Circulating levels of apolipoproteins are associated with overall cancer risk in men and across both genders with breast, lung, and colorectal cancer risk. Validation of these findings may facilitate future primary prevention strategies for cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Details

Authors
Organisations
External organisations
  • Skåne University Hospital
  • Quest Diagnostics
Research areas and keywords

Subject classification (UKÄ) – MANDATORY

  • Cancer and Oncology
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2648-2656
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume138
Issue number11
Early online date2016 Jan 25
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes