Association between Childhood Obesity and Neighbourhood Accessibility to Fast-Food Outlets: A Nationwide 6-Year Follow-Up Study of 944,487 Children

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this 6-year follow-up study was to examine whether neighbourhood accessibility to fast-food outlets was associated with diagnosed childhood obesity, after adjustment for neighbourhood- and individual-level socio-demographic factors. Methods: This 6-year follow-up study comprised 484,677 boys and 459,810 girls aged 0-14 years in Sweden. The follow-up period ran from January 1, 2005, until hospitalisation/out-patient treatment for obesity, death, emigration or the end of the study period on December 31, 2010. Multilevel logistic regression models (individual-level factors at the first level and neighbourhood-level factors at the second level) were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results: We identified 6,968 obesity cases (3,878 boys and 3,090 girls) during the follow-up period. Higher odds of childhood obesity for those living in neighbourhoods with accessibility to fast-food outlets was observed (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.07-1.22) that remained significant after adjustments (OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.00-1.13). Conclusions: This prospective nationwide study showed that the neighbourhood accessibility to fast-food outlets was independently associated with increased odds of diagnosed childhood obesity. This finding implicates that residential environments should be considered when developing health promotion programmes.

Details

Authors
Organisations
External organisations
  • Kyoto Sangyo University
  • Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Research areas and keywords

Subject classification (UKÄ) – MANDATORY

  • Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Keywords

  • Childhood obesity, Fast-food outlets, Follow-up study, Multilevel analysis
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)559-568
Number of pages10
JournalObesity Facts
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Nov 22
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes