Campylobacter jejuni in black-headed gulls (Larus ridibundus): Prevalence, genotypes, and influence on C. jejuni epidemiology

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Campylobacter jejuni in black-headed gulls (Larus ridibundus): Prevalence, genotypes, and influence on C. jejuni epidemiology. / Broman, T; Palmgren, H; Bergstrom, S; Sellin, M; Waldenström, Jonas; Danielsson-Tham, ML; Olsen, B.

In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, Vol. 40, No. 12, 2002, p. 4594-4602.

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Broman, T, Palmgren, H, Bergstrom, S, Sellin, M, Waldenström, J, Danielsson-Tham, ML & Olsen, B 2002, 'Campylobacter jejuni in black-headed gulls (Larus ridibundus): Prevalence, genotypes, and influence on C. jejuni epidemiology', Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 40, no. 12, pp. 4594-4602. https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.40.12.4594-4602.2002

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Broman, T ; Palmgren, H ; Bergstrom, S ; Sellin, M ; Waldenström, Jonas ; Danielsson-Tham, ML ; Olsen, B. / Campylobacter jejuni in black-headed gulls (Larus ridibundus): Prevalence, genotypes, and influence on C. jejuni epidemiology. In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 2002 ; Vol. 40, No. 12. pp. 4594-4602.

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Campylobacter jejuni in black-headed gulls (Larus ridibundus): Prevalence, genotypes, and influence on C. jejuni epidemiology

AU - Broman, T

AU - Palmgren, H

AU - Bergstrom, S

AU - Sellin, M

AU - Waldenström, Jonas

AU - Danielsson-Tham, ML

AU - Olsen, B

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Campylobacteriosis is a zoonotic disease in which birds have been suggested to play an important role as a reservoir. We investigated the prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni in black-headed gulls (Larus ridibundus) in southern Sweden with the aim of examining the nature of C. jejuni infection in this bird species. Birds were sampled in four sampling series each year during 1999 (n = 419) and 2000 (n = 365). Longitudinally sampled C. jejuni isolates from individual gulls were subjected to macrorestriction profiling (MRP) by pulsed-field gel ellectrophoresis to investigate the genotypical stability during the natural course of infection. Furthermore, a subset (n 76) of black-headed gull isolates was compared to isolates from broiler chickens (n = 38) and humans (n 56) originating from the same geographic area. We found a pronounced seasonal variation in C. jejuni carriage, with the highest rates found in late autumn. MRP similarities were higher between isolates of human and broiler chicken origin, than between those of wild bird origin and either of the other two hosts. However, identical MRPs were found in two gull isolates and one human isolate after digestion with two restriction enzymes, strongly indicating that they may have been colonized by the same clone of C. jejuni. The MRPs most prevalent in gull isolates did not occur among isolates from humans and broiler chickens, suggesting the existence of a subpopulation of C. jejuni adapted to species-specific colonization or environmental survival.

AB - Campylobacteriosis is a zoonotic disease in which birds have been suggested to play an important role as a reservoir. We investigated the prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni in black-headed gulls (Larus ridibundus) in southern Sweden with the aim of examining the nature of C. jejuni infection in this bird species. Birds were sampled in four sampling series each year during 1999 (n = 419) and 2000 (n = 365). Longitudinally sampled C. jejuni isolates from individual gulls were subjected to macrorestriction profiling (MRP) by pulsed-field gel ellectrophoresis to investigate the genotypical stability during the natural course of infection. Furthermore, a subset (n 76) of black-headed gull isolates was compared to isolates from broiler chickens (n = 38) and humans (n 56) originating from the same geographic area. We found a pronounced seasonal variation in C. jejuni carriage, with the highest rates found in late autumn. MRP similarities were higher between isolates of human and broiler chicken origin, than between those of wild bird origin and either of the other two hosts. However, identical MRPs were found in two gull isolates and one human isolate after digestion with two restriction enzymes, strongly indicating that they may have been colonized by the same clone of C. jejuni. The MRPs most prevalent in gull isolates did not occur among isolates from humans and broiler chickens, suggesting the existence of a subpopulation of C. jejuni adapted to species-specific colonization or environmental survival.

U2 - 10.1128/JCM.40.12.4594-4602.2002

DO - 10.1128/JCM.40.12.4594-4602.2002

M3 - Article

VL - 40

SP - 4594

EP - 4602

JO - Journal of Clinical Microbiology

JF - Journal of Clinical Microbiology

SN - 1098-660X

IS - 12

ER -