Candidate gene analysis and exome sequencing confirm LBX1 as a susceptibility gene for Idiopathic Scoliosis.

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Abstract

Idiopathic Scoliosis is a spinal deformity affecting approximately 3% of otherwise healthy children or adolescents. The etiology is still largely unknown but has an important genetic component. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a number of common genetic variants that are significantly associated with idiopathic scoliosis in Asian and Caucasian populations, rs11190870 close to the LBX1 gene being the most replicated finding.
Purpose
The aim of the present study was to investigate the genetics of idiopathic scoliosis in a Scandinavian cohort by performing a candidate gene study of four variants previously shown to be associated with idiopathic scoliosis and exome sequencing of idiopathic scoliosis patients with a severe phenotype to identify possible novel scoliosis risk variants.
Study design
This was a case control study.
Patient sample
A total of 1,739 patients with idiopathic scoliosis and 1,812 controls were included.
Outcome measure

The outcome measure was idiopathic scoliosis.
Methods
The variants rs10510181, rs11190870, rs12946942, and rs6570507 were genotyped in 1,739 patients with idiopathic scoliosis and 1,812 controls. Exome sequencing was performed on pooled samples from 100 surgically treated idiopathic scoliosis patients. Novel or rare missense, nonsense, or splice site variants were selected for individual genotyping in the 1,739 cases and 1,812 controls. In addition, the 5′UTR, noncoding exon and promoter regions of LBX1, not covered by exome sequencing, were Sanger sequenced in the 100 pooled samples.
Results
Of the four candidate genes, an intergenic variant, rs11190870, downstream of the LBX1 gene, showed a highly significant association to idiopathic scoliosis in 1,739 cases and 1,812 controls (p=7.0×10−18). We identified 20 novel variants by exome sequencing after filtration and an initial genotyping validation. However, we could not verify any association to idiopathic scoliosis in the large cohort of 1,739 cases and 1,812 controls. We did not find any variants in the 5′UTR, noncoding exon and promoter regions of LBX1.
Conclusions
Here, we confirm LBX1 as a susceptibility gene for idiopathic scoliosis in a Scandinavian population and report that we are unable to find evidence of other genes of similar or stronger effect.

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Subject classification (UKÄ) – MANDATORY

  • Orthopedics
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2239-2246
JournalThe Spine Journal
Volume15
Issue number10
Early online date2015 May 15
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes