Climate Change Adaptation in Semi-Arid Ecosystems: A Case Study from Ghana

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Climate Change Adaptation in Semi-Arid Ecosystems: A Case Study from Ghana. / Yomo, Mawulolo; Villamor, Grace B.; Aziadekey, Mawuli; Olorunfemi, Felix; Mourad, Khaldoon A.

In: Climate Risk Management, Vol. 27, 100206, 07.01.2020.

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Yomo, Mawulolo ; Villamor, Grace B. ; Aziadekey, Mawuli ; Olorunfemi, Felix ; Mourad, Khaldoon A. / Climate Change Adaptation in Semi-Arid Ecosystems: A Case Study from Ghana. In: Climate Risk Management. 2020 ; Vol. 27.

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Climate Change Adaptation in Semi-Arid Ecosystems: A Case Study from Ghana

AU - Yomo, Mawulolo

AU - Villamor, Grace B.

AU - Aziadekey, Mawuli

AU - Olorunfemi, Felix

AU - Mourad, Khaldoon A

PY - 2020/1/7

Y1 - 2020/1/7

N2 - This paper investigated the role of local institutions in facilitating farm households’ response and adaptation to climate change impacts on their livelihood. A case study of adapting to drought events associated with crop failure in a Semi-Arid Ecosystems of northern Ghana was taken. A total of 49 semi-structured interviews with key representatives of various local institutions from different sectors were conducted and 120 farm households were randomly interviewed to assess their perceptions about their livelihood outcomes and local institutions accessibility. social network analysis (SNA) has been used to bring into light the institutional framework in the context of adaptation in Bongo district. From our research we noted five salient findings and their implications in effective local level adaptation. First, the public and civic institutions in the study area play a key role in facilitating adaptation. Essentially, institutional performance is inherently local and may vary depending on their mandate as well as availability of resources. Secondly, it has been realised that most of the institutions leading adaptation among the farming community are not directly adaptation related but are those intervening in various domains of households’ rural life. Thirdly, it appears that institutional role is not limited to the leading aspect but also the ability of some institutions to channel or extend the available resources to the beneficiaries in the network (known as resources controllers or communicators), and others in controlling the flow of resources in the network (known as bridges or brokers). Fourthly, the results revealed that institutional support is more evident in term of knowledge management, on farm management than farm financial management (insurance, credit, market), livelihood diversification and the investment in infrastructures (dams). Fifthly, it appears that institutional support has at some extend facilitated adaptation within the farming communities by increasing the annual income, farm productivity and well-being while reducing households’ adaptation. This paper contributes to the growing knowledge of the role of institutional framework in the facilitation of local adaptation.

AB - This paper investigated the role of local institutions in facilitating farm households’ response and adaptation to climate change impacts on their livelihood. A case study of adapting to drought events associated with crop failure in a Semi-Arid Ecosystems of northern Ghana was taken. A total of 49 semi-structured interviews with key representatives of various local institutions from different sectors were conducted and 120 farm households were randomly interviewed to assess their perceptions about their livelihood outcomes and local institutions accessibility. social network analysis (SNA) has been used to bring into light the institutional framework in the context of adaptation in Bongo district. From our research we noted five salient findings and their implications in effective local level adaptation. First, the public and civic institutions in the study area play a key role in facilitating adaptation. Essentially, institutional performance is inherently local and may vary depending on their mandate as well as availability of resources. Secondly, it has been realised that most of the institutions leading adaptation among the farming community are not directly adaptation related but are those intervening in various domains of households’ rural life. Thirdly, it appears that institutional role is not limited to the leading aspect but also the ability of some institutions to channel or extend the available resources to the beneficiaries in the network (known as resources controllers or communicators), and others in controlling the flow of resources in the network (known as bridges or brokers). Fourthly, the results revealed that institutional support is more evident in term of knowledge management, on farm management than farm financial management (insurance, credit, market), livelihood diversification and the investment in infrastructures (dams). Fifthly, it appears that institutional support has at some extend facilitated adaptation within the farming communities by increasing the annual income, farm productivity and well-being while reducing households’ adaptation. This paper contributes to the growing knowledge of the role of institutional framework in the facilitation of local adaptation.

KW - Adaptation

KW - Diversification

KW - Infrastructure

KW - Local institutions

KW - Vulnerability

UR - https://scopus.com/record/display.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85077658764&origin=inward&txGid

U2 - 10.1016/j.crm.2019.100206

DO - 10.1016/j.crm.2019.100206

M3 - Article

VL - 27

JO - Climate Risk Management

JF - Climate Risk Management

SN - 2212-0963

M1 - 100206

ER -