Clinically Assessed Mediolateral Knee Motion: Impact on Gait.

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Clinically Assessed Mediolateral Knee Motion: Impact on Gait. / Thorlund, Jonas B; Creaby, Mark W; Simic, Milena; Hunt, Michael A; Bennell, Kim L; Ageberg, Eva.

In: Clinical journal of sport medicine : official journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine, Vol. 21, 2011, p. 515-520.

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Thorlund, Jonas B ; Creaby, Mark W ; Simic, Milena ; Hunt, Michael A ; Bennell, Kim L ; Ageberg, Eva. / Clinically Assessed Mediolateral Knee Motion: Impact on Gait. In: Clinical journal of sport medicine : official journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 21. pp. 515-520.

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Clinically Assessed Mediolateral Knee Motion: Impact on Gait.

AU - Thorlund, Jonas B

AU - Creaby, Mark W

AU - Simic, Milena

AU - Hunt, Michael A

AU - Bennell, Kim L

AU - Ageberg, Eva

N1 - The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Division of Physiotherapy (Closed 2012) (013042000)

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Mediolateral knee movement can be assessed visually with clinical tests. A knee-medial-to-foot position is associated with an increased risk of knee injuries and pathologies. However, the implications of such findings on daily tasks are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate if a knee-medial-to-foot position assessed during a clinical test was associated with altered hip and knee joint kinematics and knee joint kinetics during gait compared with those with a knee-over-foot position. DESIGN: Participants were visually assessed during a single-limb mini squat test and classified by a physiotherapist as exhibiting either a knee-medial-to-foot or knee-over-foot position. A comparison of 3-dimensional hip and knee gait kinematics and kinetics between the knee-over-foot and knee-medial-to-foot classifications was performed. SETTING: Research laboratory. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-five healthy participants were recruited and visually assessed as either knee-over-foot (n = 15; 26.2 ± 6.1 years) or knee-medial-to-foot (n = 10; 24.8 ± 4.1 years). INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Peak knee valgus angle and peak internal hip rotation during normal gait. RESULTS: No differences were observed in peak knee valgus angle [3.6 (3.7) vs 5.2 (2.5) degrees; P = 0.19], peak internal hip rotation [8.4 (7.0) vs 4.3 (8.1) degrees; P = 0.21], or knee joint kinetics between groups. CONCLUSIONS: A knee-medial-to-foot position observed during the single-limb mini squat was not reflected during gait measured by 3-dimensional motion analysis in knee healthy individuals. Furthermore, those assessed to have a knee-medial-to-foot position did not display increased loading of the knee joint compared with the knee-over-foot group. Care should be taken when extrapolating results from one movement to another.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Mediolateral knee movement can be assessed visually with clinical tests. A knee-medial-to-foot position is associated with an increased risk of knee injuries and pathologies. However, the implications of such findings on daily tasks are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate if a knee-medial-to-foot position assessed during a clinical test was associated with altered hip and knee joint kinematics and knee joint kinetics during gait compared with those with a knee-over-foot position. DESIGN: Participants were visually assessed during a single-limb mini squat test and classified by a physiotherapist as exhibiting either a knee-medial-to-foot or knee-over-foot position. A comparison of 3-dimensional hip and knee gait kinematics and kinetics between the knee-over-foot and knee-medial-to-foot classifications was performed. SETTING: Research laboratory. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-five healthy participants were recruited and visually assessed as either knee-over-foot (n = 15; 26.2 ± 6.1 years) or knee-medial-to-foot (n = 10; 24.8 ± 4.1 years). INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Peak knee valgus angle and peak internal hip rotation during normal gait. RESULTS: No differences were observed in peak knee valgus angle [3.6 (3.7) vs 5.2 (2.5) degrees; P = 0.19], peak internal hip rotation [8.4 (7.0) vs 4.3 (8.1) degrees; P = 0.21], or knee joint kinetics between groups. CONCLUSIONS: A knee-medial-to-foot position observed during the single-limb mini squat was not reflected during gait measured by 3-dimensional motion analysis in knee healthy individuals. Furthermore, those assessed to have a knee-medial-to-foot position did not display increased loading of the knee joint compared with the knee-over-foot group. Care should be taken when extrapolating results from one movement to another.

U2 - 10.1097/JSM.0b013e318230f6d8

DO - 10.1097/JSM.0b013e318230f6d8

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 515

EP - 520

JO - Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine

JF - Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine

SN - 1050-642X

ER -