Contradictory effects of dopamine at 32 degrees C in pigs anesthetized with ketamine

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: In critically ill patients who were surface cooled to 33 +/- 2 degrees C, we have observed that dopamine sometimes causes a substantial decrease in blood pressure. The present study was designed to compare the effects of dopamine in normothermia to those seen after surface cooling to 32 degrees C. METHODS: Seven pigs with a mean body weight of 21 kg were anesthetized with ketamine and muscle relaxation was induced with pancuronium. They were mechanically ventilated and given dopamine infusions (5 and 12 micrograms.kg-1.min-1)in normothermia and after surface cooling by cold water immersion to a central blood temperature of 32.0 degrees C (range 31.6-32.6 degrees C). RESULTS: In normothermia, dopamine at a dose of 5 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 increased mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) by 16% (P < 0.01) and cardiac output (CO) by 9% (P = 0.051); at 12 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 dopamine increased MAP by 26% (P < 0.01) and CO by 18% (P < 0.01). In hypothermia, MAP and CO did not change at an administration rate of 5 micrograms.kg-1.min-1; at 12 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 CO was unchanged but MAP was significantly reduced by 15% (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Dopamine increased CO and MAP in normothermia but not at 32 degrees C, where there was even a significant reduction of MAP in this porcine model.

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Research areas and keywords

Subject classification (UKÄ) – MANDATORY

  • Anesthesiology and Intensive Care

Keywords

  • Ketamine, General anesthesia, Induced hypothermia, Intravenous administration, Dopamine, Cardiotonic agent, Hemodynamics, Blood pressure, Blood flow, Heart, Systolic volume, Pig, Animal, Artiodactyla, Ungulata, Mammalia, Vertebrata
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1213-1217
JournalActa Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
Volume41
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - 1997
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes