Direct and indirect costs for anal fistula in Sweden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Direct and indirect costs for anal fistula in Sweden. / Lundqvist, Adam; Ahlberg, Ida; Hjalte, Frida; Ekelund, Mats.

In: International Journal of Surgery, Vol. 35, 01.11.2016, p. 129-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Lundqvist, Adam ; Ahlberg, Ida ; Hjalte, Frida ; Ekelund, Mats. / Direct and indirect costs for anal fistula in Sweden. In: International Journal of Surgery. 2016 ; Vol. 35. pp. 129-133.

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Direct and indirect costs for anal fistula in Sweden

AU - Lundqvist, Adam

AU - Ahlberg, Ida

AU - Hjalte, Frida

AU - Ekelund, Mats

PY - 2016/11/1

Y1 - 2016/11/1

N2 - Introduction Anal fistula is an abnormal tract with an external and internal opening that cause leakage, discomfort, and occasionally pain. Surgery is standard treatment, but recurrence and anal incontinence is common. The objective of the study was to analyze resource use, costs and sick leave for newly diagnosed patients with anal fistula in Sweden. Methods The study was based on register data from linkages between Swedish population–based registers including patients treated for anal fistula in Västra Götaland County, Sweden. Health care resource use, costs and sick leave were estimated. Results The sample included 362 patients of which 27% had no surgery, 37% had one surgery and 36% had multiple surgeries. Patients with multiple surgeries underwent over four surgeries on average. Approximately 67% of the contacts occurred during the first year after diagnosis. Estimated mean sick leave was 10.4 full-time equivalent days per patient. Total discounted costs were €5,561 per patient where approximately 80% were direct costs. Discussion To our knowledge this is the first study of resource use, costs and sick leave related to anal fistulas. The study indicates that anal fistula is a condition that is costly for society and that the burden of anal fistula in terms of health care resources and sick leave is especially high for patients experiencing multiple surgeries. Conclusion Anal fistula is a condition that is costly for society and there is an unmet need for the group of patients with multiple surgeries to find appropriate treatment interventions.

AB - Introduction Anal fistula is an abnormal tract with an external and internal opening that cause leakage, discomfort, and occasionally pain. Surgery is standard treatment, but recurrence and anal incontinence is common. The objective of the study was to analyze resource use, costs and sick leave for newly diagnosed patients with anal fistula in Sweden. Methods The study was based on register data from linkages between Swedish population–based registers including patients treated for anal fistula in Västra Götaland County, Sweden. Health care resource use, costs and sick leave were estimated. Results The sample included 362 patients of which 27% had no surgery, 37% had one surgery and 36% had multiple surgeries. Patients with multiple surgeries underwent over four surgeries on average. Approximately 67% of the contacts occurred during the first year after diagnosis. Estimated mean sick leave was 10.4 full-time equivalent days per patient. Total discounted costs were €5,561 per patient where approximately 80% were direct costs. Discussion To our knowledge this is the first study of resource use, costs and sick leave related to anal fistulas. The study indicates that anal fistula is a condition that is costly for society and that the burden of anal fistula in terms of health care resources and sick leave is especially high for patients experiencing multiple surgeries. Conclusion Anal fistula is a condition that is costly for society and there is an unmet need for the group of patients with multiple surgeries to find appropriate treatment interventions.

KW - Anal fistula

KW - Direct cost

KW - Registry

KW - Sick leave

KW - Sweden

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84989229126&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijsu.2016.09.082

DO - 10.1016/j.ijsu.2016.09.082

M3 - Article

VL - 35

SP - 129

EP - 133

JO - International Journal of Surgery

T2 - International Journal of Surgery

JF - International Journal of Surgery

SN - 1743-9159

ER -