Early Childhood Gut Microbiomes Show Strong Geographic Differences Among Subjects at High Risk for Type 1 Diabetes.

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Bibtex

@article{f9b8633d06ec4b6f8bb9d2d52a9adc50,
title = "Early Childhood Gut Microbiomes Show Strong Geographic Differences Among Subjects at High Risk for Type 1 Diabetes.",
abstract = "Gut microbiome dysbiosis is associated with numerous diseases, including type 1 diabetes. This pilot study determines how geographical location affects the microbiome of infants at high risk for type 1 diabetes in a population of homogenous HLA class II genotypes.",
author = "Kemppainen, {Kaisa M} and Ardissone, {Alexandria N} and Davis-Richardson, {Austin G} and Fagen, {Jennie R} and Gano, {Kelsey A} and Le{\'o}n-Novelo, {Luis G} and Kendra Vehik and George Casella and Olli Simell and Ziegler, {Anette G} and Rewers, {Marian J} and {\AA}ke Lernmark and William Hagopian and Jin-Xiong She and Krischer, {Jeffrey P} and Beena Akolkar and Schatz, {Desmond A} and Atkinson, {Mark A} and Triplett, {Eric W}",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.2337/dc14-0850",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "329--332",
journal = "Diabetes Reviews",
issn = "1935-5548",
publisher = "American Diabetes Association",
number = "2",

}