Epitope-specificity of recombinant antibodies reveals promiscuous peptide-binding properties.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Protein-peptide interactions are a common occurrence and essential for numerous cellular processes, and frequently explored in broad applications within biology, medicine, and proteomics. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanism(s) of protein-peptide recognition, specificity, and binding interactions will be essential. In this study, we report the first detailed analysis of antibody-peptide interaction characteristics, by combining large-scale experimental peptide binding data with the structural analysis of eight human recombinant antibodies and numerous peptides, targeting tryptic mammalian and eukaryote proteomes. The results consistently revealed that promiscuous peptide-binding interactions, that is, both specific and degenerate binding, were exhibited by all antibodies, and the discovery was corroborated by orthogonal data, indicating that this might be a general phenomenon for low-affinity antibody-peptide interactions. The molecular mechanism for the degenerate peptide-binding specificity appeared to be executed through the use of 2-3 semi-conserved anchor residues in the C-terminal part of the peptides, in analogue to the mechanism utilized by the major histocompatibility complex-peptide complexes. In the long-term, this knowledge will be instrumental for advancing our fundamental understanding of protein-peptide interactions, as well as for designing, generating, and applying peptide specific antibodies, or peptide-binding proteins in general, in various biotechnical and medical applications.

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Research areas and keywords

Subject classification (UKÄ) – MANDATORY

  • Immunology in the medical area

Keywords

  • antibody specificity, anti-peptide antibody, peptide binding, immunoaffinity peptide capture, mass spectrometry
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1897-1910
JournalProtein Science
Volume21
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes