Gender but not diabetes, hypertension or smoking affects infarct evolution in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients - Data from the CHILL-MI, MITOCARE and SOCCER trials

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Infarct evolution rate and response to acute reperfusion therapy may differ between patients, which is important to consider for accurate management and treatment of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the association of infarct size and myocardial salvage with gender, smoking status, presence of diabetes or history of hypertension in a cohort of STEMI-patients. Methods: Patients (n = 301) with first-time STEMI from the three recent multi-center trials (CHILL-MI, MITOCARE and SOCCER) underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging to determine myocardium at risk (MaR) and infarct size (IS). Myocardial salvage index (MSI) was calculated as MSI = 1-IS/MaR. Pain to balloon time, culprit vessel, trial treatments, age, TIMI grade flow and collateral flow by Rentrop grading were included as explanatory variables in the statistical model. Results: Women (n = 66) had significantly smaller MaR (mean difference: 5.0 ± 1.5% of left ventricle (LV), p < 0.01), smaller IS (mean difference: 5.1 ± 1.4% of LV, p = 0.03), and larger MSI (mean difference: 9.6 ± 2.8% of LV, p < 0.01) compared to men (n = 238). These differences remained significant when adjusting for other explanatory variables. There were no significant effects on MaR, IS or MSI for diabetes, hypertension or smoking. Conclusions: Female gender is associated with higher myocardial salvage and smaller infarct size suggesting a pathophysiological difference in infarct evolution between men and women.

Details

Authors
Organisations
External organisations
  • La Timone University Hospital
  • Odense University Hospital
  • Oslo university hospital
Research areas and keywords

Subject classification (UKÄ) – MANDATORY

  • Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems

Keywords

  • Area at risk, Diabetes, Gender, Hypertension, Sex
Original languageEnglish
Article number161
JournalBMC Cardiovascular Disorders
Volume19
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jul 3
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes