Grey and white matter clinico-anatomical correlates of disinhibition in neurodegenerative disease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Disinhibition is an important symptom in neurodegenerative diseases. However, the clinico- anatomical underpinnings remain controversial. We explored the anatomical correlates of disinhibition in neurodegenerative disease using the perspective of grey and white matter imaging. Disinhibition was assessed with a neuropsychological test and a caregiver information- based clinical rating scale in 21 patients with prefrontal syndromes due to behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 12) or progressive supranuclear palsy (n = 9), and healthy controls (n = 25). Cortical thickness was assessed using the Freesurfer software on 3T MRI data. The integrity of selected white matter tracts was determined by the fractional anisotropy (FA) from Diffusion Tensor Imaging. Disinhibition correlated with the cortical thickness of the right parahippocampal gyrus, right orbitofrontal cortex and right insula and the FA of the right uncinate fasciculus and right anterior cingulum. Notably, no relationship was seen with the thickness of ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Our results support an associative model of inhibitory control, distributed in a medial temporal lobe-insularorbitofrontal network, connected by the intercommunicating white matter tracts. This reconciles some of the divergences among previous studies, but also questions the current conceptualisation of the prefrontal syndrome and the central role attributed to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex in inhibitory control.

Details

Authors
Organisations
External organisations
  • Skåne University Hospital
  • Karolinska Institutet
  • Lund University
Research areas and keywords

Subject classification (UKÄ) – MANDATORY

  • Neurology
  • Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0164122
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume11
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Oct 1
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes