Hearing histories of Hammer Hill: Pop music as auditory geography

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Focusing on artful, embodied listening as a method of analysing the emotional intensities of place, this article calls for academic geographers to listen to practitioners of nonacademic geography. It explores an ethical and methodological agenda for understanding how pop musicians have heard the world, and for taking them seriously as creative geographers who contribute sophisticated interpretations of and interventions in space. It listens emotionally to Jens Lekman's auditory reminiscences – informed by listening and expressed through song – pertaining to the marginalised and stigmatised Gothenburg suburb of Hammarkullen (or ‘Hammer Hill’). By understanding how Lekman's ideas about his home suburb relate to pop musical history, the article analyses the musician's interpretive geographical methods and the effect sound can have on space. It juxtaposes these methods with recent scholarly research on sonic and listening geographies, and embraces the emotional listening practised by pop music fans to appreciate how scholars can learn from this form of nonacademic geography.

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Research areas and keywords

Subject classification (UKÄ) – MANDATORY

  • Musicology

Keywords

  • Emotional listening, Fan listening, Pop music, Nonacademic geography, Jens Lekman, Hammarkullen, Gothenburg
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34-40
JournalEmotion, Space and Society
Volume30
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Feb
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes