Hyrtl's anastomosis is normally developed in placentas from small for gestational age infants.

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Abstract

Background. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence and appearance of the anastomosis between the two umbilical arteries in placentas from infants small for gestational age (SGA).

Methods. The arterial systems of 64 placentas from singleton pregnancies resulting in SGA infants were visualized by angiography. The method allowed study of the anastomosis between the umbilical arteries and calculation of the relative placental area supplied by each artery. The results were compared with findings in a previous study of appropriate for gestational age (AGA) infants. One-way analysis of variance (anova) and chi2-analyses were used for statistics.

Results. In 56 placentas the anastomosis was represented by a true vessel, in two by a fenestration, and in another two cases by fusion of the umbilical arteries. The anastomosis was absent in one case and another three cases had a single umbilical artery (SUA). When the diameter of the anastomosis was thinner than that of the umbilical arteries, their supply areas were significantly (p <= 0.001) more symmetrical than in cases with a wider anastomosis.

The anatomy of the anastomosis and the relationship between its width and the symmetry between the supply areas of each umbilical artery did not differ in placentas from SGA and AGA infants, despite various types of cord insertion and placentation.

Conclusion. Static measurements of Hyrtl's anastomosis do not indicate a contributing part for intrauterine growth retardation.

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Subject classification (UKÄ) – MANDATORY

  • Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)716-721
JournalActa Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
Volume82
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 2003
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes

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