Interaction with the host: the role of fibronectin and extracellular matrix proteins in the adhesion of Gram-negative bacteria

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The capacity of pathogenic microorganisms to adhere to host cells and avoid clearance by the host immune system is the initial and most decisive step leading to infections. Bacteria have developed different strategies to attach to diverse host surface structures. One important strategy is the adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (e.g., collagen, fibronectin, laminin) that are highly abundant in connective tissue and basement membranes. Gram-negative bacteria express variable outer membrane proteins (adhesins) to attach to the host and to initiate the process of infection. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms of bacterial adhesion is a prerequisite for targeting this interaction by "anti-ligands" to prevent colonization or infection of the host. Future development of such "anti-ligands" (specifically interfering with bacteria-host matrix interactions) might result in the development of a new class of anti-infective drugs for the therapy of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the manifold interactions of adhesins expressed by Gram-negative bacteria with ECM proteins and the use of this information for the generation of novel therapeutic antivirulence strategies.

Details

Authors
Organisations
External organisations
  • Goethe University
  • University Hospital of Tubingen
Research areas and keywords

Subject classification (UKÄ) – MANDATORY

  • Microbiology in the medical area
  • Immunology in the medical area
Original languageEnglish
JournalMedical microbiology and immunology
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2019 Nov 29
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes