Measurements of wound edge microvascular blood flow during negative pressure wound therapy using thermodiffusion and transcutaneous and invasive laser Doppler velocimetry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The effects of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) on wound edge microvascular blood flow are not clear. The aim of the present study was therefore to further elucidate the effects of NPWT on periwound blood flow in a porcine peripheral wound model using different blood flow measurement techniques. NPWT at -20, -40, -80, and -125 mmHg was applied to a peripheral porcine wound (n = 8). Thermodiffusion, transcutaneous, and invasive laser Doppler velocimetry were used to measure the blood perfusion 0.5, 1.0, and 2.5 cm from the wound edge. Thermodiffusion (an invasive measurement technique) generally showed a decrease in perfusion close to the wound edge (0.5 cm), and an increase further from the edge (2.5 cm). Invasive laser Doppler velocimetry showed a similar response pattern, with a decrease in blood flow 0.5 cm from the wound edge and an increase further away. However, 1.0 cm from the wound edge blood flow decreased with high pressure levels and increased with low pressure levels. A different response pattern was seen with transcutaneous laser Doppler velocimetry, showing an increase in blood flow regardless of the distance from the wound edge (0.5, 1.0, and 2.5 cm). During NPWT, both increases and decreases in blood flow can be seen in the periwound tissue depending on the distance from the wound edge and the pressure level. The pattern of response depends partly on the measurement technique used. The combination of hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion caused by NPWT may accelerate wound healing.

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Subject classification (UKÄ) – MANDATORY

  • Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)727-733
JournalWound Repair and Regeneration
Volume19
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes

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