Median nerve latency measurement agreement between portable and conventional methods

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A portable nerve conduction testing device was compared with a conventional method of measuring median nerve distal latencies. In a population-based study, a health questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of 3000 participants (aged 25 to 74 years). Two hundred and sixty-two responders with numbness and/or tingling in the median nerve distribution, and 125 asymptomatic responders underwent clinical examination as well as portable and conventional median nerve distal latency measurements. Motor latency measured with the portable device was on average 0.1 millisecond (ms) lower than motor latency measured with the conventional method (95% limits of agreement, -0.8-0.5 ms). Sensory latency (wrist-to-index finger) measured with the portable device was on average 0.3 ms lower than sensory latency (long finger-to-wrist) measured with the conventional method (95% limits of agreement, -0.7-0.1 ms). Strong correlations were found between the latencies measured by the portable and conventional methods (Pearson correlation coefficient, 0.90-0.93). The agreement between the portable and conventional methods in measuring median nerve distal latencies appears to be acceptable. The cut-off value for abnormal sensory latency needs to be lower for the portable than the conventional method if the present measurement techniques are used.

Details

Authors
External organisations
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Research areas and keywords

Subject classification (UKÄ) – MANDATORY

  • Physiotherapy
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-77
JournalJournal of Hand Surgery (British Volume)
Volume25
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2000
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographic note

The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Division of Physiotherapy (Closed 2012) (013042000)