Migration of the Charnley stem in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. A roentgen stereophotogrammetric study

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Abstract

Migration of 65 Charnley stems implanted with modern cementing techniques was studied by roentgen stereophotogrammetry. There were 25 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 40 with osteoarthritis (OA) followed up for two years. In 43 cases a bone sample for histomorphometric analysis was obtained from the femur during the operation. In 22 cases the mean subsidence of the prosthetic head was 0.40 mm and in 20 the mean posterior migration was 1.25 mm. There was no difference in migration between the two diagnostic groups (p = 0.8) after adjusting for variations in gender, age and weight. Male gender was associated with increased subsidence (p = 0.006). Histological examination showed that the RA series had more osteoid surface (p = 0.04), but neither this, nor any of the other histomorphometric variables, influenced migration. These results suggest that, unlike the acetabular socket, the cemented Charnley femoral component is equally secure in osteoarthritis and in rheumatoid arthritis, and that its initial fixation is not influenced by the quality of the local cancellous bone. Our results provide data with which the early performance of new prosthetic designs and fixation methods can be compared.

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Subject classification (UKÄ)

  • Orthopedics
  • Surgery
  • Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)18-22
JournalJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery: British Volume
Volume77-B
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1995
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes

Bibliographic note

The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Reconstructive Surgery (013240300), Medical Radiology Unit (013241410), Clinical and Molecular Osteoporosis Research Unit (013242930)