Prevalence of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) in stroke patients: A cross-sectional, clinical survey.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

AIMS: The aims of this study were primarily to investigate the prevalence, severity and impact on daily life of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) in a clinical sample of stroke patients and secondly to identify factors associated with LUTS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a cross-sectional, hospital based survey whereby stroke patients were invited by letter to complete The Danish Prostatic Symptom Score (DAN-PSS-1) questionnaire at least 1 month following their stroke. Subjects were asked to report the frequency and severity of their symptoms (symptom score) and the impact of each symptom on their daily life (bother score) over the previous fortnight. Of 519 stroke patients invited, 482 subjects were eligible. RESULTS: The response rate was 84%. The period prevalence of at least one symptom was 94%; the most frequent symptom was nocturia (76%) followed by urgency (70%) and daytime frequency (59%). The most severe symptom was urgency followed by nocturia and daytime frequency. Among respondents who had at least one symptom, the prevalence of bother was 78%. Likewise the most frequent bothersome symptom was nocturia (53%), followed by urgency (48%) and daytime frequency (40%). Paresis in legs, symptoms of urinary incontinence on admission, and use of analgesics were significantly associated with severity, whereas the prevalence and bother of LUTS could not be associated with other patient characteristics. CONCLUSION: LUTS are highly prevalent in stroke patients and have a major impact on daily life. Neurourol. Urodynam. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Details

Authors
  • Sigrid Tibaek
  • Gunvor Gard
  • Peter Klarskov
  • Helle K Iversen
  • Christian Dehlendorff
  • Rigmor Jensen
Organisations
Research areas and keywords

Subject classification (UKÄ) – MANDATORY

  • Urology and Nephrology
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)763-771
JournalNeurourology and Urodynamics
VolumeJun 12
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes

Bibliographic note

The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Division of Physiotherapy (Closed 2012) (013042000)