Progression of Early Retinal Dysfunction in Diabetes Over Time: Results of a Long-term Prospective Clinical Study.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Progression of Early Retinal Dysfunction in Diabetes Over Time: Results of a Long-term Prospective Clinical Study.

AU - Hellgren, Karl-Johan

AU - Agardh, Elisabet

AU - Bengtsson, Boel

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - We explored signs of retinal dysfunction over time in diabetic subjects before or early in the course of retinopathy. Patients with no, mild, or moderate retinopathy were consecutively recruited and underwent standard automated perimetry, visual acuity measurement, and fundus photography. These examinations and measurements of HbA1c and blood pressure were repeated for up to 5 years from baseline. Visual field improvement/deterioration in diabetic subjects was evaluated using significance limits for change. Progression or regression of retinopathy was defined as a two-step change on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study final severity scale. Seventy-four subjects completed at least 3 years of follow-up, and 22% showed visual field worsening, defined as repeated significant deterioration at ≥10% of the test points, whereas only 1% showed field improvement. Worsening occurred in subjects both with and without vascular lesions. The degree of retinopathy was stable throughout the observation period in 68 of 74 eyes, improved in 4, and worsened in 2. Visual field deterioration was not correlated with a change in retinopathy. By using perimetry with an analysis tailored for monitoring diabetic subjects, we were able to demonstrate progression of retinal dysfunction over time, which may represent early signs of retinal neurodegeneration.

AB - We explored signs of retinal dysfunction over time in diabetic subjects before or early in the course of retinopathy. Patients with no, mild, or moderate retinopathy were consecutively recruited and underwent standard automated perimetry, visual acuity measurement, and fundus photography. These examinations and measurements of HbA1c and blood pressure were repeated for up to 5 years from baseline. Visual field improvement/deterioration in diabetic subjects was evaluated using significance limits for change. Progression or regression of retinopathy was defined as a two-step change on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study final severity scale. Seventy-four subjects completed at least 3 years of follow-up, and 22% showed visual field worsening, defined as repeated significant deterioration at ≥10% of the test points, whereas only 1% showed field improvement. Worsening occurred in subjects both with and without vascular lesions. The degree of retinopathy was stable throughout the observation period in 68 of 74 eyes, improved in 4, and worsened in 2. Visual field deterioration was not correlated with a change in retinopathy. By using perimetry with an analysis tailored for monitoring diabetic subjects, we were able to demonstrate progression of retinal dysfunction over time, which may represent early signs of retinal neurodegeneration.

U2 - 10.2337/db13-1628

DO - 10.2337/db13-1628

M3 - Article

VL - 63

SP - 3104

EP - 3111

JO - Diabetes

T2 - Diabetes

JF - Diabetes

SN - 1939-327X

IS - 9

ER -