Prototype effect and the persuasiveness of generalizations

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Prototype effect and the persuasiveness of generalizations. / Dahlman, Christian; Sarwar, Farhan; Bååth, Rasmus; Wahlberg, Lena; Sikström, Sverker.

In: Review of Philosophy and Psychology, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2015, p. 163-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Prototype effect and the persuasiveness of generalizations

AU - Dahlman, Christian

AU - Sarwar, Farhan

AU - Bååth, Rasmus

AU - Wahlberg, Lena

AU - Sikström, Sverker

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - An argument that makes use of a generalization activates the prototype for the category used in the generalization. We conducted two experiments that investigated how the activation of the prototype affects the persuasiveness of the argument. The results of the experiments suggest that the features of the prototype overshadow and partly overwrite the actual facts of the case. The case is, to some extent, judged as if it had the features of the prototype instead of the features it actually has. This prototype effect increases the persuasiveness of the argument in situations where the audience finds the judgment more warranted for the prototype than for the actual case (positive prototype effect), but decreases persuasiveness in situations where the audience finds the judgment less warranted for the prototype than for the actual case (negative prototype effect).

AB - An argument that makes use of a generalization activates the prototype for the category used in the generalization. We conducted two experiments that investigated how the activation of the prototype affects the persuasiveness of the argument. The results of the experiments suggest that the features of the prototype overshadow and partly overwrite the actual facts of the case. The case is, to some extent, judged as if it had the features of the prototype instead of the features it actually has. This prototype effect increases the persuasiveness of the argument in situations where the audience finds the judgment more warranted for the prototype than for the actual case (positive prototype effect), but decreases persuasiveness in situations where the audience finds the judgment less warranted for the prototype than for the actual case (negative prototype effect).

KW - allmän rättslära

KW - jurisprudence

U2 - 10.1007/s13164-015-0264-1

DO - 10.1007/s13164-015-0264-1

M3 - Article

VL - 7

SP - 163

EP - 180

JO - Review of Philosophy and Psychology

T2 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology

JF - Review of Philosophy and Psychology

SN - 1878-5166

IS - 1

ER -